Zombie Deer Disease: What You Need to Know

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Zombie Deer Disease

Zombie deer disease, also known as chronic wasting disease (CWD), is a fatal neurological disorder that affects deer, elk, moose, and other members of the cervid family. It is caused by misfolded proteins called prions, which damage the brain and spinal cord of infected animals, leading to weight loss, abnormal behavior, loss of coordination, and eventually death. There is no cure or vaccine for CWD, and it can spread through direct contact or exposure to contaminated environments.

What are the symptoms of zombie deer disease?

CWD has a long incubation period, meaning that infected animals may not show any signs of illness for months or years. However, as the disease progresses, some of the common symptoms include:

  • Excessive salivation and thirst
  • Drooping ears and head
  • Difficulty swallowing and breathing
  • Lack of fear of humans and predators
  • Aggression and isolation
  • Emaciation and starvation

These symptoms may resemble those of other diseases or conditions, such as rabies, malnutrition, or poisoning. Therefore, it is important to report any suspicious wildlife sightings to the local authorities and avoid contact with sick or dead animals.

Zombie Deer Disease
Zombie Deer Disease

How does zombie deer disease spread?

CWD can spread through various routes, such as:

  • Direct contact between infected and susceptible animals, especially during mating, fighting, or grooming
  • Indirect contact with contaminated soil, water, plants, or equipment, where prions can persist for years
  • Maternal transmission from mother to offspring, either in utero or through milk
  • Animal movement, either natural or human-assisted, across different regions or countries

CWD is highly contagious and can affect both captive and wild populations of cervids. It has been detected in 26 states in the US, as well as in Canada, Norway, Finland, and South Korea.

Is zombie deer disease a threat to humans?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there is no strong evidence that CWD can infect humans. However, there is also no definitive proof that it cannot. Some studies have suggested that CWD may pose a potential risk to human health, especially if people consume meat or organs from infected animals. Therefore, the CDC recommends the following precautions:

  • Do not hunt, handle, or eat meat from animals that look sick or test positive for CWD
  • Wear gloves, eye protection, and a mask when field dressing or processing deer or elk
  • Use a knife dedicated to this purpose and avoid cutting through the brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, or lymph nodes
  • Have your harvested animal tested for CWD before consuming it
  • Dispose of the carcass and waste properly, preferably by burying or incinerating them
  • Follow the local regulations and guidelines regarding CWD management and surveillance

How can zombie deer disease be prevented and controlled?

Currently, there is no effective way to eradicate CWD once it is established in a population. However, some measures can help prevent or slow down its spread, such as:

  • Reducing the density and contact rate of cervids, either by hunting, culling, or fencing
  • Enhancing the surveillance and testing of cervids, especially in areas where CWD is known or suspected to occur
  • Implementing strict biosecurity and sanitation protocols for captive cervid facilities and transport vehicles
  • Educating and engaging the public, hunters, landowners, and wildlife managers about CWD and its implications
  • Supporting the research and development of new tools and strategies to combat CWD
Zombie Deer Disease
Zombie Deer Disease

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between zombie deer disease and mad cow disease?

Zombie deer disease and mad cow disease are both caused by prions, but they affect different species of animals. Mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), affects cattle and can be transmitted to humans, causing a variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). Zombie deer disease, or chronic wasting disease (CWD), affects deer, elk, moose, and other cervids, and has not been proven to infect humans.

Can dogs get zombie deer disease?

There is no evidence that dogs can get CWD, but they may act as carriers of the disease if they consume or come in contact with infected animals or materials. Therefore, it is advisable to keep dogs away from deer or elk carcasses and to monitor their health and behavior.

How do you kill a zombie deer?

The only way to kill a zombie deer is to destroy its brain, either by shooting, stabbing, or burning it. However, this may not be safe or legal, depending on the situation and location. It is better to report any zombie deer sightings to the local authorities and let them handle the situation.

How do you cook deer meat to avoid zombie deer disease?

The best way to cook deer meat to avoid CWD is to follow the CDC guidelines, which include:
1. Do not eat meat from animals that look sick or test positive for CWD
2. Have your harvested animal tested for CWD before consuming it
3. Use a meat thermometer and cook the meat to an internal temperature of at least 165°F (74°C)
4. Avoid eating the brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, or lymph nodes of deer or elk

How long does zombie deer disease last?

CWD has a long incubation period, meaning that infected animals may not show any signs of illness for months or years. However, once the symptoms appear, the disease is always fatal and usually kills the animal within a few weeks or months.

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